ADVOCATING FOR BEEF ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE

Queensland Beef Corridors

A road network that doesn’t keep pace with the demands of the industry it serves.  

A lack of a solutions-based investment and piecemeal funding leads to a slow loss of competitiveness and has negative impacts on downstream supply chain opportunities. 

Now is the time to connect the dots.

  • Recognise the issues and solutions.
  • Create a collectively agreed and formal 5-10 year beef road funding program that reflects a share in investment equivalent to the industry output.
  • Collect data for future strategies.  
  • Completely seal beef roads and achieve consistency across heavy vehicle corridors. 

CONNECTING THE DOTS

Navigate the map and click on the roads to learn more about their current condition and funding requirements.

Are we missing a road? Let us know

Unlocking potential

Stretching across an area of nearly 242,000 square kilometres, the road corridors form a strategic web of agricultural supply chains from east to west.
They carry a world-class beef product and contribute $1.7 billion to the Australian economy.

Upgrading these roads is paramount for the future…

Economy 

Eliminate key capacity constraints on Central Queensland’s biggest agricultural commodity.  

Confidence for value-add businesses. 

Employment opportunities from upscaled operations and capital investment.  

People  

Improved road safety for all road users. 

Revitalised communities with a sense of regional identity and recognised beef industry. 

A sense of recognition that regional communities are indispensable contributors to the Australian society.

Producers and industry operators 

Enhanced productivity through reducing or eliminating impediments on delivery. 

Certainty for producers that upscaling operations is viable.  

Confidence within both the production and processing sectors to maintain supply chain consistency all year round. 

Reliability for processors for production and quality. 

Consumers 

Improved animal welfare with reduced travel times, larger trucking configurations, eliminating dust and heat stress.  

Reliability in production and quality.  

Heavy vehicle industry 

Reduced maintenance costs on heavy vehicle fleet businesses. 

Potential for higher profits margins and renewed capital investment and employment. 

Road safety improvements for drivers and road users, particularly around fatigue management. 

Industry leaders agree

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The beef industry of today, and the one that our children will inherit, is no longer about producing a low value commodity. It’s time that the Dawson Development Road is upgraded to a standard that the growing, flourishing industry requires.

– Bernadette Paine, Grazier, Springsure

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Proper road infrastructure would expand our markets, increase accessibility to important infrastructure for both our families and business and reduce the disruptive impacts caused by standard weather events.  

– David Kemp, Feedlot Operator, Lotus Creek

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To me, this is about opening up the west. If we can get better roads, we can put more families in these remote towns that are dying. It’s a beautiful place, that produces all the beef. How can we help it thrive?

– Fred Appleton, Organic Grazier, Alpha

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On a gravel road the biggest expense on trucks is the maintenance on the trailers, running gear, suspension, brakes and bushes, secondly fuel consumption and then wear and tear on tyres. In my opinion, the people who make the decisions aren’t where the action is going on but in metropolitan areas, they need to be more hands-on, get out and work out what’s going on. It’s a really good idea and a good opportunity to address some of these longstanding issues, as long as we get a result. 

– Ken Dillon, Livestock Transporter, Clermont

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Improvements in road infrastructure will lead to greater productivity not only for transport operators, but for all links on the beef supply chain due to the reduction o fstress placed upon the livestock being transported.

– Gerard Johnson, President, Livestock and Rural Transporters Association of Queensland

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